Achieving emission reductions: new tools, technologies and practices across the agro-food chain

Session number 7 Room: Al Areen Ballroom 1-2

Key Messages

  1. Public-private partnerships engaging multiple stakeholders across the agro-food value chain, are needed to reduce emissions at scale.
  2. As stewards of the land, farmers have a good sustainability story to tell.  Farm-level tools such as those used by Field to Market help them to identify and to accelerate gains
  3. Sustainable farming and agro-food systems is not an end state, but rather a process of continuous improvements, as farming, processing and other functions along the food chain become more efficient.  The private sector is driving these changes through investment, innovation and education
  4. Public-private partnerships are key to developing scalable solutions and sharing knowledge and expertise between countries and sectors of the agro-food chain
  5. Public-private partnerships develop new, heretofore unexplored solutions, utilizing the range of expertise, resources and shared knowledge that can be synthesized.

Session summary

A number of stakeholders across the agro-food chain including farmers, businesses,  NGOs and governments are partnering to rise to this challenge, working together to increase productivity, while improving adaptation and mitigation strategies. Comprehensive agricultural strategies that recognize the need to meet the demands of a growing world while reducing carbon emissions requires careful evaluation across the supply chain to determine what innovations and practices can have the greatest impacts in meeting these goals. By scaling up these existing technologies to help with resource efficiency and crop productivity, the food supply chain can have significant and measurable impacts on carbon emissions.

The Roundtable showed that there are already many initiatives being implemented, both at larger scale and as pilot projects, such as free online tools for farmers to voluntarily and securely analyze how their management choices impact natural resources and operational efficiency. Farmers, businesses, NGOs and governments are collaborating to develop reliable metrics that can measure how mitigation and adaptation goals are being met from farm to fork. There already are best practices and technologies across the supply chain that can improve climate change mitigation and adaption today if scaled up globally.

Some of the challenges to scaling up can be found in both farmers’ risk averseness and the lack of effort to collect newest scientific knowledge to farmers and to farmers’ local and traditional knowledge. The Roundtable showed that it is crucial to have first movers that will implement new techniques, technologies and practices as a way of moving to scale.

Furthermore, the Roundtable found that there are significant co-benefits from mitigation activities, such as higher yields, rural development, increased incomes etc. that farmer can benefit from and that will influence their decision making.

The Roundtable concluded by agreeing that there is no one solution that fits all. The only one crucial element is data, as without the ability to measure carbon, it will not be possible to improve production and reduce carbon emissions from agriculture.

Organiser: Farming First

Blogs from this session:
Don’t count your GHG emissions before they hatch

More session information ↓

Brief synopsis of the issue
Reducing the carbon footprint of agro-food chains both through production and land use represents a critical opportunity to agriculture and global food security in coming decades.  All farmers are increasingly facing new challenges including increased drought, changes in pest pressure and unpredictable weather patterns as global temperatures continue to rise. This threatens agriculture’s ability to improve global farm incomes, while meeting the food demands of a growing population. Rising greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, which represent 14% of global emissions currently, will only compound climate changes, if means of reducing agriculture’s emissions both through production and sparing land are not scaled.A number of stakeholders across the agro-food chain including farmers, businesses,  NGOs and governments are partnering to rise to this challenge, working together to increase productivity, while improving adaptation and mitigation strategies. Comprehensive agricultural strategies that recognize the need to meet the demands of a growing world while reducing carbon emissions requires careful evaluation across the supply chain to determine what innovations and practices can have the greatest impacts in meeting these goals. By scaling up these existing technologies to help with resource efficiency and crop productivity, the food supply chain can have significant and measurable impacts on carbon emissions.This session will highlight best practices and technologies across the supply chain that can improve climate change mitigation and adaptation today if scaled up globally. In addition, speakers will discuss how farmers, businesses, NGOs and governments are collaborating to develop reliable metrics that can measure how mitigation and adaptation goals are being met from farm to fork.Agenda for the session:

  • Presentation from Keith A. Wheeler, Chairman and CEO ZedX Inc., President of IUCN-US, and Field to Market Member
  • Presentation from Dyborn Chibonga, Chief Executive Officer, National Smallholder Farmers’ Association of Malawi
  • Presentation from Simon Aumonier, Partner & Head of Waste Management, Energy and Climate Change Teams, Environmental Resources Management
  • Presentation from Belinda Morris, California Director, American Carbon Registry, an enterprise of Winrock International
  • Presentation from Dr Mohammed Asaduzzaman, Research Director, Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies
  • Question and answer session with audience members

In addition, throughout the session, speakers and moderator will engage the audience in order to create an environment of interaction and dialogue.

This will be achieved through live audience polling at key points of a presentation or discussion. The information gained in these polls will be used to tailor presentations and discussions during the session in order to provide not just engagement, but ensure audience members receive the most relevant and helpful information to the audience.

Questions to be addressed:

  1. What are some of the common misperceptions regarding emissions along the agro-food chain?
  2. How are stakeholders across the agro-food chain evaluating and addressing their mitigation and adaption strategies?
  3. How are the initiatives profiled in the session achieving scale?
  4. What role do partnerships along the agro-food chain play across these efforts?  What makes these partnerships work?  What are the challenges?